“there is only one way under high heaven to get the best of an argument - and that is to avoid it .”

The Power of Avoiding Arguments

We’ve all been in situations where we’ve found ourselves in the middle of an argument that just doesn’t seem to be going anywhere. Whether it’s with a friend, family member, or coworker, arguments can be frustrating and exhausting, leaving us feeling drained and defeated.

However, there is a saying that goes, “there is only one way under high heaven to get the best of an argument – and that is to avoid it.” This quote, attributed to Dale Carnegie, suggests that sometimes the best way to “win” an argument is to not engage in it at all.

Why might this be the case? Well, arguments can often be emotionally charged, and people tend to become defensive when their beliefs or opinions are challenged. When we try to prove someone wrong or insist on our own viewpoint, we can inadvertently make the other person feel attacked, which can lead to an even more heated argument.

Furthermore, when we are in the middle of an argument, we tend to become more focused on being “right” than on finding a solution or understanding the other person’s perspective. This can lead us to ignore important information or miss opportunities for compromise.

Of course, this doesn’t mean that we should never express our opinions or stand up for ourselves. However, it does suggest that we should approach disagreements with a focus on finding common ground rather than “winning” the argument. Sometimes, the best way to do this is to simply avoid engaging in the argument altogether.

This can be especially true when we are dealing with people who are not receptive to new information or are unwilling to change their beliefs. In these situations, it can be difficult to make any progress through argumentation, and it may be more productive to simply agree to disagree and move on.

In conclusion, while it may be tempting to engage in arguments in order to prove our own points, sometimes the best approach is to simply avoid the argument altogether. By approaching disagreements with a focus on finding common ground rather than “winning” the argument, we can create a more positive and productive environment, and avoid the negative consequences that can come with arguing.